Appreciate your Denzel Dumfriezen, give him confidence and don’t deviate from your strategy too quickly.

W.Why the Dutch national team looks like an occasional disorganised and insecure team in one game (against Austria) and a well-oiled winning machine that knocks the opponent off the mat in the next game is mostly a mystery. However, there are lessons to be learned from the resurrection that national coach Ronald Koeman has achieved, lessons that every coach can take to heart.

1. Appreciate your Denzel Dumfriezenthe hard workers who throw themselves into the game with heart and soul. Dumfries was never seen as a great talent in his youth, but he didn’t accept it. Through hard work he rose to the absolute top. The fighting spirit that was required for this still characterises him.

It was he who won a crucial header duel at the start of the match, it was he who tirelessly pushed down the wing. Dumfries is not the most technically gifted player, but the Dutch national team cannot do without him, as was demonstrated against Austria. Just as it was impossible without Johan Neeskens, Edgar Davids and Dirk Kuijt before.

The position of the newspaper is expressed in the Volkskrant commentary. It is the result of a discussion between the commentators and the editor-in-chief.

2. Give confidence to your playersAt a time when many managers are trying to gain greater control over their staff with spreadsheets, data and audience figures, it is very refreshing to see a national coach working with a focus on trust, who understands that this gives players the confidence to do well and the inspiration to excel.

Despite the criticism of Memphis Depay, Koeman continued to believe in him, so Depay is improving with each game. In a further show of confidence, he brought in midfielder Joey Veerman. Veerman had a terrible game against Austria, in which he did not strike the ball well. It was feared that he would never appear again in the orange shirt, especially in this tournament. Koeman understood that he had to be given another chance, immediately in the next game.

3. Don’t deviate from your plan or strategy too quickly. After the disaster against Austria, there was a lot of pressure on Koeman to completely change course. He did not succumb to it, on the contrary. With a few small and precise adjustments, the system he had in mind would continue to work perfectly. In a football team, players always have to get used to each other. That will not work if you change tactics too often. Also very educational for politicians who propose a change of system to solve a clear problem.

4. Appreciate a good defeat. The German team did not really get going until 1974, after suffering a humiliating defeat against East Germany. In 1988, the Dutch team suffered a defeat in the opening game against Russia. Too many big wins can actually breed overconfidence and weakness, as in 2008, when the Netherlands were ignominiously beaten by Guus Hiddink’s Russia after glorious victories over France and Italy.

5. Ignore the emotions of the Dutch.The average Dutch football fan is He will be happy to thank you. This is due to the ever-increasing expectations. In principle, at every tournament the Dutch team is expected to be as dominant as in 1974 and to win this time. So it can only be disappointing, but if it is disappointing, it will set in such a huge sadness that it can only be better than expected afterwards. You cannot make a policy out of that.

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