Stopping smoking at any age helps reduce cancer risk, but quitting younger helps even more

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Fifteen years after stopping smoking, a person’s cancer risk drops to 50% of the risk associated with continued smoking. A population-based study following almost three million participants in Korea found that quitting smoking at any age helps reduce the cancer risk, and stopping before middle age, especially for lung cancer, reduced the risk substantially.

Journal/conference: JAMA Network Open

Link to research (DOI): 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.54958

Organisation/s: Department of Cancer Control and Population Health, National Cancer Center Graduate
School of Cancer Science and Policy, Goyang, Republic of Korea.

Funder: This work was supported by a National Cancer Center grant (NCC-2210862) funded by the
Korean government, Republic of Korea.

Media release

From: JAMA

Sustained smoking cessation was associated with a significantly reduced risk of cancer after 10 years since quitting in this study of 2.9 million Korean adults. Quitting at any age helped reduce the cancer risk, and especially for lung cancer, early cessation before middle age exhibited a substantial risk reduction.

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